Category: Linux Admin

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NFS Client Configuration in Linux

Setting up a client to use NFS is relatively simple when you have the NFS server in place. Let’s set up the Client01 system to use a share on the RHEL01 NFS server.

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Troubleshooting NFS Configuration in Linux

There are three management commands that help with troubleshooting NFS from both the server and client sides: mountstats          Shows information about mounted NFS shares nfsstat                  Shows statistics of exported resources nfsiostat              Shows statistics of NFS mounted shares First, let’s look at which resources are exported. For...

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NFS Configuration in Linux

The Network File Systems (NFS) protocol works great when it comes to Linux systems because it allows for client flexibility, centralized management of files, and some other great features. To get NFS working properly, you need to set up the NFS server first and then set...

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Squid Web Proxy configuration in Linux

A proxy server is a device that usually sits between a client and the destination the user is trying to reach. It can provide security, anonymity, and even protection for the client behind the proxy. To help in this process is Squid, which is a web...

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Configuring Linux Web Services using Apache httpd

The most commonly used web server in the world today is Apache—and with good reason. Built with security in mind, Apache is a solid and stable web server that has been around for years. The module design allows for scalability and ease of use. Apache can...

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Installing and configuring SSH Service in Linux

You know that at some point or another you will need to be able to administer servers remotely, and you wouldn’t want to do this without some sort of security in place, right? SSH can protect the traffic that passes from your computer to a remote...

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Storage Related tasks – Linux Disk Partitioning

Working with disks is an important part of maintaining storage space on your system. Partitions determine how your storage space is carved out for use later by the system and its users.  When adding more storage or creating it for the first time, you should partition...

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working with Linux runlevels

When the system boots up, it queries for the default runlevel, which is defined in  the /etc/inittab file. When that default runlevel is located, the system boots into that particular runlevel. The different runlevels are essentially “states,” which allow services to be started or stopped depending...

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